Saturday, 26 May 2007

£2.2m upgrade for care home




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A CONTROVERSIAL care home run by Sunderland Council could be in line for a £2.2million revamp.
Social Services bosses want to redevelop the Wellesley Community Home in Blyth, Northumberland, which houses some of the toughest young offenders from Wearside.Currently it accommodates up to 30 children and takes up 22 acres of land. Under plans outlined by Social Services director John Marsden a large part of the Wellesley site will be demolished, including 16 staff houses, offices, a chapel and a bungalow.In their place will be four new accommodation blocks and new office building, releasing a large area of land which will be available for sale.And the home will then only take up eight acres of land compared to the 22
acres it currently occupies.Mr Marsden says the refit will cost £2.2million and the council has put aside £1.5million already.The rest of the cash will eventually come from the trustees of the home after the sale of the surplus land.But for the time being, councillors are being asked to approve the whole amount until the sale goes through.The former Wellesley Nautical School was given a facelift in 1993, when £280,000 was spent to help it house girls as well as boys.But a year later, the home was at the centre of a political storm which led to calls for a public inquiry by city Tories.A group of youngsters housed at the centre ran amok in Rothbury, Northumberland, and stole a car.The Tories wanted an urgent review of security and called for resignations over the matter.Later that year, a group of youngsters, believed to be high on solvents, ran amok at the centre
The Childrens Centre at Durham
Social Services director John Marsden said he will not be suggesting closure until next summer.Speaking at a meeting last night of the Social Services committee, Mr Marsden said: "I have always said that we wouldnt close the centre until we had proper alternatives for the children and I wont be suggesting closure until next August."He added: "We have enough money out of the budgets to run the centre for the rest of this year and part or all of next year. We will review the situation again at the end of this year."80,000 people had signed a petition started by the Echo asking for the centre not to be closed.

CARE SERVICES DENY FOSTERING C
A YOUTH leader, sacked from hi
Dismissed Herrington Burn YMCA leader Chris Jones claims children who have lived with him at his home over the past 16 years were sent to him by social services in Sunderland, Durham and Darlington.But all three councils say they have never placed children with the Sunderland magistrate. Children have been placed with the YMCA – but none of those should have been living one-to-one with Mr Jones in his home.Darlington Council is now investigating Mr Joness claims that at least one youngster from its social services system had lived with him for five months.At Sunderland, director of social services John Marsden said: "We have never placed a child with him personally. "We have used the YMCA for day activities and occasionally accommodation –usually 16-plus-year-olds. "There may have been the occasional 15-year-old, when there has been a crisis with their parents, for the short-term."If he has taken children, not into the YMCA, but into his own home without our knowledge that is grossly inappropriate."One child who has lived with Mr Jones had been there under a private arrangement with his parents. Mr Marsden said his officers had been informed of this situation as required by law because the boy was under 16. But had not introduced the child to Mr Jones, as he claims and he did not know of any
other such arrangements.Mr Marsden said: "The parents made the placement. We had no reason to intervene."Mr Jones continues to claim the three councils have officially placed youngsters with him and youth and community leader at the YMCA, Paul Ramsay, has backed Mr Joness claims saying he has sat in on meetings when social workers have put children in Mr Joness care.At Durham County Council a spokesman said they may have placed youngsters with the YMCA but never Mr Jones individually.He said: "If anybody had been sent to a communal type establishment and we found they had been taken out of there and were spending time with individuals for any length of time then we would be most concerned. "If children subject to care orders to Durham CC have been staying with him at his house and he claims this and he is not a registered foster carer that is something we will be looking into."
New post for social services director




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SUNDERLAND social services director John Marsden is leaving after a decade on Wearside.
Mr Marsden is taking up the new post of chief executive at the troubled North Tyneside Council.The 53-year-old takes over the £100,000-a-year post after almost 10 years in charge of Sunderland Council's social services department.Mr Marsden took over from Roy Parker at a time when social services in Sunderland were in crisis.The former director of
community services at the London Borough of Barnet was the fourth director of social services on Wearside in two years when he started in August 1992.In his time at Sunderland he has had to handle sensitive children's cases such as that of Laura Kane and Corey Raine and a trial of former workers at Witherwack House, a trial which eventually collapsed.But he was rewarded by Government inspectors last month when his department was one of only eight in the country to get a maximum three stars for its performance.He will take up the challenge of moving to a council which has recently had to make £11million-worth of cuts because of financial problems.Mr Marsden is the latest top director at Sunderland council to leave this year.Four directors have retired and Irene Lucas, former chief of City Contracting Services, has moved to South Tyneside Council as its new chief executive.
WE FAILED COREY - MARSDEN
FAMILY SNAPSHOT: Corey Raine with his mum Sarah Allison who killed him while suffering from post-natal depression. Right, Sunderland's social services director John Marsden.
SOCIAL workers "failed to fully understand" the impact of a disturbed teenage mother's mental state which led to her battering her baby to death.
John Marsden, director of social services at Sunderland City Council, today admitted that staff did not recognise signs that Sarah Allison had deep-rooted problems and may have needed more support.Mr Marsden's comments came after the publication of the Area Child Protection Committee's (ACPC) report into the death of Allison's six-month-old son Corey Raine.Corey suffered extensive injuries and multiple fractures to his head after Allison, 19, banged him against a wall at home in Windsor Crescent, Houghton, on April 12, last year, while suffering from post-natal depression "of a marked degree".She is now serving four years divided between hospital and a young offenders' institute after pleading guilty to infanticide.During her trial at Newcastle Crown Court it emerged that Corey was on the child protection at-risk register.A social worker who visited Corey two days before he died had reported no concerns.The ACPC report stated that quality of assessment in health and social services "sometimes fell below the best standards for assessment work".This meant there was a focus on "practical and material support and responding to crises in the family, rather than on a good understanding of the protection issues in this case".Mr Marsden said Corey was primarily placed on the at-risk register because his father, Philip Raine, 30, was classed as a schedule one offender. Staff had focused on Mr Raine and provided practical support for the family, he added. As a result, they had missed signs from Allison's childhood. She had been involved with care services in Stockton-on-Tees
from a young age, before moving to Wearside. Mr Marsden said: "The full impact of Sarah's disturbed and unhappy childhood and the impact of the depression after the birth were not fully understood." "The real problem was what the staff involved didn't realise was the full impact of her rather sad and difficult background." He added that there had been no justification for taking Corey into care and that no one was to predict that Allison's depression would lead to her son's death. A shake-up of child care within social services has now taken place which will see less experienced or less qualified social workers reporting back to more experienced "supervisors" in a bid to identify problems such as those suffered by Allison. The report added that "individual managers should be held to account for poor practice in this case and the necessary action is presently on-going to determine this
Wellesley's children are coming home




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A TROUBLED children's home will finally close next month in a shake-up that will bring vulnerable youngsters back to Wearside.
Sunderland Council-run Wellesley Community Home, in Blyth, will close and the final 10 youngsters move out, ending a link dating back almost 140 years.The 27-bed care home, the centre of a long-running closure campaign by residents, has been gradually wound down by council chiefs over the last year.Its closure – a month early – will see cash spent on more units in Sunderland, with two to open in Hendon and Witherwack.Barbara Williams, Sunderland Council's new head of safeguarding, said the closure was part of a policy to cut the number of youngsters in the city's eight children's homes, while giving families, better support "to stay together"."We don't need Wellesley any more," she said. "In the past it has done an excellent job, but things have moved on and the expectations we have for looked after children has changed."It's no longer good enough to send them 25 miles away from the city where they live; also, why should they like it? Times have changed and we have to change with them."Until the middle of last year, there were 28 boys, aged between 12 and 18 there, but this dwindled after the closure of two of the four houses. At one point Wellesley took in "senior delinquent boys" from Sunderland, and other areas, and has been dogged for years by links to crime sprees in and around Blyth.Mrs Williams insisted there would be "no substantial saving", with the £1.8million saving ploughed into improving services in the city.More foster carers have been recruited, while the council are revamping flats for teenagers after they leave care, to help them become more independent.One is to open in Hendon, with eight flats offering round-the-clock care for 17 and 18-year-olds. Another is planning to reopen in Witherwack for youngsters with moderate learning difficulties.Mrs Williams said: "We are confident because we have provided the right level of support and the right staff to give young people a good level of support. They are not going to
be left on their own to fend for themselves."There are now eight small children's homes in Sunderland, housing youngsters over 11.Mrs Williams said: "You could walk past them and not know they were children's homes. We want our children to have an opportunity that isn't any different from other children."Retired railway worker George Tuff, who lives on the Solingen estate next to Wellesley, believes many will be glad to see it go.Mr Tuff, 75, who chairs the Solingen Residents' Association, said: "We're pleased it's going, we can now breathe a sigh of relief. We've had endless complaints and hopefully they will now come to an end. Anyone who lives near the home has had trouble from it. We just hope there isn't a final spate of crimes before it shuts."The centre was founded in 1868 as the Wellesley Nautical School and the site is owned by trustees, who will now decided its future
Home troubles mount
TROUBLED teenagers have gone missing from a controversial children's home more than 220 times in less than a year, new figures have revealed.
Wellesley Community Home, run by Sunderland Council, takes in children from Wearside and other parts of the North East, some of whom are awaiting trial for criminal offences. The figure obtained by the Echo includes the number of arrests made by police both in and outside the home, due to close in 2007. Using the powers of the Freedom of Information Act, the Echo has obtained details of children who have gone on the run from Wellesley over the last 11 months, as well as arrest figures linked to the home. Youngsters are still being sent to Wellesley from Sunderland as it winds down over the next two years. As part of a multi-million pound plan, the children will be relocated across Sunderland to foster homes or looked-after care, while the 27-bed care home is closed down. Staff from Wellesley will be based on Wearside as part of a new support team. It has emerged that between October last year and September, police were alerted 223 times about children going missing from Wellesley. In January, nine youngsters – half of its residents – walked out 45 times, while in July a dozen children logged 44 unauthorised absences. Last month, just one teen went missing. Police, meanwhile, have been called into the home eighteen times to arrest residents for alleged offences ranging from assault to criminal damage. Five more were arrested outside the home between October last year and September. Retired railway worker George Tuff, who lives on the Solingen estate next to the home, said the figures for incidents outside Wellesley were the tip of the iceberg. Mr Tuff, who chairs the Solingen Residents’ Association, said: “The problems have gone on for years. Sunderland Council either doesn’t want to know or they are not being informed. The police seemed to be dealing with things and the
message isn’t getting back to Sunderland Council, but the problem hasn’t got any better.” Wellesley was founded in 1868 as a boys’ school and is owned by a board of trustees. Sunderland Council manages it and takes in children from across the North East. A spokesman for Sunderland City Council said most of its unauthorised absences at Wellesley were “short term and the young person does not go far”. “The longer term are generally when the young person returns to his home area. In these situations it is almost invariably the case that the young person is staying at home.” He added that the number of youngsters “who offend is a small minority” adding: “It is, however, worth noting that the majority of offending behaviour is within the home, directed at property, other young people or staff. Relatively little crime is perpetrated within the community either in Blyth or Sunderland.”
Fight for abuse 'justice' goes on




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A SUNDERLAND man who has fought a tireless campaign to expose alleged abuse in Sunderland children's homes has won £25,000 in compensation, it was revealed today.
And Brian Clare, 33, of Grindon, has vowed to continue his 18-year battle to secure "justice" for youngsters who claim they were physically and sexually abused at the city's now-demolished Witherwack House and other care homes.A 60-strong group of former children in care of Sunderland City Council in 1960s, 70s, and 80s launched civil damages claims for the physical, sexual and emotional abuse they say ruined their lives.Fifteen lead cases were due to be heard at Newcastle County Court this week, but, as the Echo exclusively revealed, the city council agreed to out-of-court settlements.The biggest pay-out to an individual abuse victim was £50,000 and the total paid to all 15 is around £200,000. The council has not admitted any liability.Another 45 cases are still waiting in the wings, but leading law firm, Stewarts, who specialise in personal injury law, now hope an across the board settlement will be reached.Mr Clare, one of the 15 victims who settled their cases, today vowed to carry on fighting for abused children across the country.Mr Clare said he was subjected to a catalogue of abuse in Witherwack House from 1979 to 1984 and added the settlement had left him disappointed that the full truth was not allowed to come out in a full trial.He said the cash meant "nothing" to him , and vowed to continue his battle for justice by helping others who have been abused to bring their cases to court .He said: "There is no such thing as justice for children
who have been abused but I feel I have to carry on fighting for what I believe in."Mr Clare, who suffers from epilepsy and is unable to work, said: "All the money I have received is going to be spent on counselling for me after what I witnessed while I was in care of Sunderland City Council ."I still suffer from nightmares - this case became my whole life and it still is. I never had a life as a normal child, and it's difficult for me to have a life as an adult ."I would have liked to have had my day in court, but I have to acknowledge the debt I owe my family for giving me the strength to come this far."Other cases being dealt with by Stewarts concern a total of 23 care homes across the North East.Solicitor, Paul Middleton-Roy, said that, until the settlement, the city council had disputed all the claims - despite a damning NSPCC report into the events at Witherwack House.
Last Updated:

thrown out

A JUDGE has thrown out Sunderl
After nearly six days of legal argument, Judge Michael Cartlidge made his decision yesterday and, more than two years after it began, the Witherwack House criminal case collapsed.It is unlikely that ex-Witherwack staff will face abuse charges, and today a leading campaigner and former child resident said he would now press for a public inquiry.Meanwhile, Detective Chief Superintendent David Wilson, who led the Northumbria Police investigation, said: "The police are disappointed that the victims stories will not be given an airing at trial."He could not estimate the cost of the investigation.The four men facing charges of child cruelty were reported not to be in court to hear Judge Cartlidge say it would be wrong to put them on trial after so long. He dismissed the cruelty charges against them.They were: Robert Chapman, of Bradwell Common, Milton Keynes; Adrian Garbutt,of Spout Lane, Washington; Raymond Maude, of Calderbourne Avenue, Sunderland and Peter Murray, of Morris Street, Birtley.According to the Crown Prosecution Service, the judges reasons were that it would be hard to get reliable evidence about events of 20 years ago and the fact that there had been six separate investigations into Witherwack House at least two were commissioned by the council could have tainted evidence from witnesses, through repeated interviews with different agencies.The judge said the public had a right to expect such cases to be brought to court, and said the police and CPS were right to do so.Judge Cartlidges ruling angered a former child resident of Witherwack House, who was to have given evidence against the four ex-staff members.Brian Clare founded and led the campaign for a fresh look at Witherwack, on behalf of former child
inmates.

compensation

Abuse claimants win compensation

The Witherwack children's home closed 10 years ago
Former residents of a council-run children's home who claim they were abused have won thousands of pounds in compensation.
Lawyers for Sunderland City Council have agreed out-of-court settlements of up to £50,000 each for 15 alleged victims, just days before a civil test case was due to be heard in Newcastle.
They are part of a 60-strong group who say their lives were ruined at Sunderland's now-demolished Witherwack House, and 24 other care homes across Wearside and the North East, between 1960 and 1990.
A spokesman for Sunderland City Council, which denies liability, said: "The hearing due to commence on 24 February at Newcastle County Court is no longer proceeding on the basis of settlements agreed."
Cases reviewed
The council took its decision following a recent Court of Appeal hearing, which extended the time limit given to adults who allege abuse occurred when they were children.
Solicitor Brian Peuch said he was "optimistic" about gaining settlements for the remaining 45 claimants, whose files will now be reviewed by his legal team.
He told BBC News Online: "Our other claimants' cases will be reviewed. If they were in homes where compensation has now been negotiated for others, we would be looking to get comparable compensation for them."
The current legal action - the largest of its kind in the north-east of England - emerged after two care workers at Witherwack House were found guilty of child cruelty in 1993.
Three years ago a trial into claims of child neglect at the home collapsed.
A Newcastle Crown Court trial judge cleared four former social workers, after ruling that witness statements from events up to 20 years earlier could not be relied upon.
Mr Peuch said: "The other claimants can be optimistic, though I don't want to raise their hopes too much."
Since Witherwack House closed 10 years ago, there has been an independent inquiry and two police investigations into allegations of abuse in city council-run homes.

whistle blowers

Do we have any choice? When we are told of abuse by other staff, if we do not do every thing in our power to bring it to light and try to get it dealt with properly, we become colluders with a cover-up. The cost is often high, as the following stories show, but the benefits are that each whistleblower contributes to changing the climate and culture of social care to challenge the acquiescence with malpractice of too many organisations- and standing against abuse cover-ups means giving a voice to the victims.
1. Alison Taylor was head of a children's home in Gwynedd, North Wales from 1982-87. She blew the whistle about abuse of children and police investigated in March 1986. In October, they reported to the Director of Social Services. Alison (not the alleged abusers) was suspended and later sacked in 1987. She continued to lobby the Welsh Office, the Secretary of State for Wales, the DSS Inspectorate, the Prime Minister and successive Health Ministers, the Home Office and the National Children's Bureau with her dossier of 75 allegations. However, it was only when she took it to HTV television company and they did a documentary, when the concerns about widespread abuse in children's homes in North Wales got taken seriously and the Waterhouse Tribunal on Child Abuse was set up (due to report in January 2000). 300 former residents made complaints of assault against 148 adults.
2. Carryn Williams, assistant Director for Caerphilly Social Services, blew the whistle when a former manager who had been dismissed for failure to protect children, got a new job working with vulnerable care leavers. He got the job with a housing agency after getting a reference from Caerphilly Council. Carryn told Tai Cymru, which oversees Welsh housing agencies, and she was sacked after those who wrote the reference complained. The manager she whistled on was awarded £14000 in a court settlement for having the housing job offer withdrawn.
3. Elaine Bowerman worked in a Warrington school for children with learning disabilities. she spent 10 years trying to get her union, Lancashire Council and the police about indecent assault and violence by Robert Boyle, but when she finally took her warnings to parents, she was sacked. Boyle was tried in 1997, but was only found guilty of lying. Only then did the court learn that he had been convicted 20 years earlier for indecent assaults. Lancashire has subsequently introduced a whistleblowers' procedure for child abuse: "Intimidation of any employees who report concerns will be regarded as gross misconduct."
4. Karen McKay demanded that children's complaints about Taff Vale Children's Home, Cardiff, be investigated. she lost her job, but her refusal to be silenced provoked a police inquiry that spread to 32 other homes in the area and a series of trials and convictions of abusive staff.
5. Susan Machin was a Senior Social Worker at Ashworth Special Hospital, Merseyside. She gave evidence to the inquiry into alleged abuse of patients. She lost her job, but was later vindicated by an industrial tribunal. Ashworth has since been reorganized, including senior staff losing their jobs. (Susan Machin was Chair of FtC until early 1999.)
6. Jane Jones, deputy matron of a nursing home in North Yorks, blew the whistle on the owner sexually abusing elderly residents. he was arrested as a result.
7. Colin Smart, Director of Sunderland Social services, was told that 3 ex-Sunderland care workers had been previously sacked for sexual assault on children. He attempted to investigate why the police had never been told. he discovered a series of other abuses in the home the staff had worked in, with some of the violence involved apparently approved by councillors as a form of control. Councillors and other chief officers tried to block Colin, who resigned in protest. Following failed police investigations, he compiled 5 volumes of evidence on abuse and suppression of evidence. The Council took High Court action against Colin to restrain him from publication of their confidential documents and he was gagged. Finally, ex-residents of the home forced Sunderland to set up an NSPCC investigation, apologize to them and the Police resumed their investigation.
8. Chris Clode and Janet Hover were managers in Flintshire, North Wales. When 2 children's home staff were found to have abused a child, the managers wanted staff to be disciplined. When Chief Officers refused to discipline the staff or stop them working with children, Janet and Chris were removed from their jobs. Later they were asked to be witnesses at the North Wales Child Abuse Tribunal against Flintshire, who had to apologize to the Tribunal for preventing whistleblowing

thrown out

Operation Rose
All 15 of the cases that have been taken by the police against our clients have now been thrown out by the courts.
The accused have denied the allegations made against them from the very beginning and the fact that courts have found no basis to those allegations raises some important questions about the police investigation.
Gill Rutherford, the Thompsons lawyer who has represented the majority of people investigated and all 15 wrongly accused which have been taken to Court , called on the police to reflect on their handling of the investigation.
"If allegations are made against individuals they must of course be investigated. But the fact that the police investigation paid no heed to the overwhelming evidence that my clients were innocent raises serious doubts about the fairness of the way in which the investigation was conducted.
"I am of course extremely pleased to have been able to defend these clients and to have seen justice done and their names cleared. But the fact is that Operation Rose has not only caused needless suffering and distress to 15 innocent people and their extended families and friends which has impacted on their right to respect for private and family life, but has also been a scandalous waste of public money
A ten - year police investigation into sexual and physical abuse at 361 children's homes has been criticised after resulting in only six convictions despite 730 allegations against around 200 care workers.
Operation Rose was conducted by Northumbria Police, at a cost of £5 million, after a woman in her twenties disclosed to a social worker that she and a friend had been abused as children in care.
Initial inquiries identified thirty victims who alleged abuse, dating from the Sixties, by eight suspects at twenty seven homes in four local authority areas.
Police embarked on a process of "trawling" for information by writing to 1,800 former residents explaining that they were looking into homes where they had once lived.
As a consequence homes runs by two voluntary agencies and all six local authorities in the force area - Northumberland, Newcastle upon Tyne, North Tyneside, Gateshead, South Tyneside and Sunderland - came under investigation.
A total of 277 residents and former residents made allegations against 223 care workers for alleged offences including rape, buggery, indecent assault and physical assault.
Of 32 people who were charged with a total of 142 offences, five were found guilty, one pleaded guilty, 12 were found not guilty, nine had cases withdrawn, four died before their cases were heard and one remained on file.
Court reporting restrictions, which previously prevented publicity of the Operation Rose trials, were lifted at the conclusion of the final case this week.
Esme Allenby, 54, of Cramlington, Northumberland, was told she would not face trial for nine counts of indecent assault, dating back 27 years, which she denied.
The prosecution at Newcastle Crown Court told Judge Maurice Carr that it was in the public interest that the trial did not proceed because vital documents were missing.
The North-East branch of Falsely Accused Carers and Teachers, an organisation set up after instances of unproved allegations elsewhere in the country, attacked the police approach to gathering complaints.
Ray Johnston, the co-chairman of Fact (North East), said: "Scores of carers and teachers have had their lives ruined and the lives of their families destroyed by these actions."
Mr Johnston was suspended from his post as a senior teacher at Netherton Park in Northumberland in August 1997. He said: "I was just fully aware I hadn't done anything to justify being suspended at all and thought it was thoroughly wrong."
Mr Johnston learnt from colleagues that a girl had accused him of physical assault and eight months after his suspension he was arrested and later charged with five counts of child cruelty and two of physical assaults.
After years of court adjournments Mr Johnston's case was dismissed after a judge ruled that the three and a half-year delay in the case had breached his human rights. He has now submitted a complaint to the Police Complaints Authority citing victimisation and malicious prosecution.
A former teacher, Derek Gordon, from Chester-le-Street, Co Durham, said Operation Rose had left him "marked for life" even though he was acquitted of child abuse charges.
Northumbria Police defended Operation Rose. The assistant chief constable John Scott, said: "It was a thorough and professional investigation. Six people involved in child abuse have been put behind bars as a result of our investigations

operation rose police fight back

Police leading a huge but largely abortive child abuse inquiry denied yesterday they had encouraged false allegations and wrecked the lives of innocent teachers and care workers by "trawling" for evidence in children's homes.
Dozens of professionals in the north-east, backed by MPs, have lodged complaints about the blunderbuss effect of the five-year Operation Rose that saw more than 200 people investigated but in the end only six convicted.
The £5m inquiry led to 558 claims of assault, rape and other sexual abuse from 277 residents or former residents of 61 care homes.
The methods used by Northumbria police have been referred to the Commons home affairs committee, which is studying the handling of hundreds of similar child abuse allegations in care homes.
The scale of the north-east inquiry has emerged with the lifting of a legal gag. The two years of reporting restrictions on the trials of 32 north-east care workers and teachers linked to 142 allegations of child abuse, ended on Tuesday with the collapse of the final case in Newcastle crown court.
The legal move has cleared the way for the complaints of care workers and teachers either acquitted by juries or told by police that they would not face trial.
Ray Johnson, co-chairman of the north-east branch of Falsely Accused Carers and Teachers, said that the clumsy snail's pace investigation had destroyed his life and career as it had scores of others.
He has lodged papers with the police complaints authority claiming malicious prosecution and victimisation after a judge threw out charges against him because a three-and-a-half-year delay had flouted his human rights. "My life has been utterly destroyed for the past five years for no reason whatsoever," he said. "People who abuse children physically or sexually should be punished, but the methods of the Northumbria police have brought the downfall of innocent people whose only crime was to look after disaffected children in homes."
John Scott, assistant chief constable of Northumbria police, defended the idea of the "trawling" system yesterday but acknowledged that it could trap the innocent. He said: "We would conduct the inquiry in the same way, were we to do it again. However, recommendations have been made to establish best practice."
The police have now drawn up recommendations for child abuse inquiries involving care homes, which include "fast track" legal preparation to get cases quickly to court, and a national protocol to record unused material.
There are about 85 cases pending nationally and the Commons committee is studying a further 100 convictions of care workers and teachers dating back 30 years.
The committee chair, Chris Mullin, Labour MP for Sunderland, said in January as the inquiry was set up: "It's been suggested that a new genre of miscarriage of justice has arisen from the over-enthusiastic pursuit of allegations of abuse of children in institutions. The decision to conduct this inquiry was taken in response to a large number of well argued representations."
Typical among the cases of Operation Rose was that of a Esme Allenby, 54, a care worker whose life was said to be ruined by nine allegations of indecent assault. Though the police never took the claims to trial, she was devastated by the public pursuit of the claims.

u tell me

Shirley Carr and solicitor Alison Stott of Alison Stott solicitors, Aykley Vale Chambers, Aykley Heads, Durham City have admitted the use of fraud in the civil proceedings which was used to engineer my alleged bankruptcy. Its clear police don't want to act on that because Carr is their present whipping stick for use against me. They are proving this as fact beyond all reasonable doubt. My crime? I contributed to the Nolan Enquiry into Freemasonry within the Police and Judiciary. An Enquiry which I now believe was nothing short of a whitewash job to allay public concerns about the power being exercised by vile masons. Masons are aware that their Masonic Mafia brothers ruling our police and judiciary will protect them. Their established satanic rings interfering with children must get boring for some of them sometimes. How many masons I wonder were involved in the child abuse cases at Witherwack Estate, Sunderland. Why were masons at the Sunderland Civic Centre trying to hush the whole thing up? What happened to the person investigating these things who came to my home for registration details of vehicles used by masons? The contact number I was given for that investigator went dead? Why were police records held on mason Hamilton, the Dunblane mass child killer, all erased? These are the true facts of life, not the one's authority would often have us believe. A film I saw a few years ago contained the remark, "shit always floats to the

was the masons involved in a cover up

It is now known that the Masonic Mafia operating within the North East County Court circuit have issued a warrant for my arrest for failing to appear for a public examination of my alleged bankruptcy. An alleged bankrupty of which they themselves engineered by fraud and acts taken to pervert the course of justice. Some of the evidence which proves this was supplied to Mr P. Leaver QC at the London Court of Appeal which is without question the Headquarters of Britains Masonic Judicial Mafia. Leaver told me last month he had no interest in that evidence I provided to him. It has recently been published that beginning now to head Britains " Fat Cats" are QC's. Why I wonder is this coming about now under Blair's alleged fairer Britain? Could it be that corruption is paying better dividends? Leaver failed in the duty for which we pay him to act when he saw evidence of fraud, conspiracy to defraud, and perjury committed by my civil opponent Miss Shirley Carr, and acts to pervert the course of justice carried out by Deputy District Judge Baird, District judges Scott-Phillips, and Cuthbertson, backed up by District Judge Jones. Former recorder John H. Fryer-Spedding along with those I name are criminals I believe presently being protected by Masonic Mafia policemen who are also now in receipt of evidence of my allegations. Except for Spedding who fled when I reported to former Lord Chancellor Mackay facts showing that he had taken deliberate action to pervert the course of justice, these men are still operating in the North East County Court circuit. Mackay, I understand is another mason, which does not surprise me given the fact that the whole of the British Judicial system is infested with it. Irvine still refrains to admit or deny he is also a mason. So too do Woolf, Bingham, Auld and Pill. They do not deserve to hold the title of Lords and they are proving this more and more daily, not only in my case but in the cases of many others who are eventually defrauded by means of Woolf's "Secret Briefings" being carried out at the London Court of appeal.
The ruling under the Hoffman/Pinochet case is not applying to me thus showing that the devil takes care of his own. I do not consider a single one of these men is fit to hold any public office. I thank them for showing me, and now many others, that there are different rules being operated by the evil British Judiciary, depending on who you are. We are now without doubt being ruled by criminals.
I am also aware that despite a ruling made in the European Court this year under a fair trial (Article 6 ECHR Law) litigants can take along a pocket tape recorder to courts to record proceedings. Judges are openly defying that ruling which was obtained by a Mr Norman Scarth of Leeds, UK. Who are the judges trying to protect, themselves or the guilty or both? Who on this earth do these people think they are? We are now European Citizens governed by European law. They, the judges are public servants not the other way around. There are some I have appeared before who I would not even trust with the job of cleaning public toilets. There are I now know many just like them who are being backed up by Wolf, Bingham, and Irvine and Straw. Are they all urinating in the same Masonic Mafia cess pit?
Shirley Carr and solicitor Alison Stott of Alison Stott solicitors, Aykley Vale Chambers, Aykley Heads, Durham City have admitted the use of fraud in the civil proceedings which was used to engineer my alleged bankruptcy. Its clear police don't want to act on that because Carr is their present whipping stick for use against me. They are proving this as fact beyond all reasonable doubt. My crime? I contributed to the Nolan Enquiry into Freemasonry within the Police and Judiciary. An Enquiry which I now believe was nothing short of a whitewash job to allay public concerns about the power being exercised by vile masons. Masons are aware that their Masonic Mafia brothers ruling our police and judiciary will protect them. Their established satanic rings interfering with children must get boring for some of them sometimes. How many masons I wonder were involved in the child abuse cases at Witherwack Estate, Sunderland. Why were masons at the Sunderland Civic Centre trying to hush the whole thing up? What happened to the person investigating these things who came to my home for registration details of vehicles used by masons? The contact number I was given for that investigator went dead? Why were police records held on mason Hamilton, the Dunblane mass child killer, all erased? These are the true facts of life, not the one's authority would often have us believe. A film I saw a few years ago contained the remark, "shit always floats to the top". Never were more true words spoken. Too many people turn a blind eye to the truth. If it don't hurt me then I don't want to know about it is all too often heard. Maybe when people eventually wake up, they might well find they are subject of a dictatorship under Bomber Blair as was stated by MP Tony Benn on national TV a couple of weeks ago?
Acting detective S. Coxon of Northumbria Police Force now informs my solicitor, Mr Hughes of Harding Swinburne and Jackson Solicitors, 58 Frederick Street, Sunderland, Tyne-Wear that he will supply a progress report when Detective Chief Superintendent Atkinson returns from leave in early December. I saw Atkinson last December at Washington Police Station. When I arrived there he told me he had just telephoned the Home Office. He said they had told him to have nothing to do with my allegations because they were involved with civil proceedings. He went on to say that perjury was not a police matter. When I asked him if he was a mason, he replied that as he was not required to give that information, he would not answer.
We now also have the Northumbria Police Authority acting improperly in regard to my allegations against Northumbria Police. My fax letter to them of November, 17 pointing out their offence under the Police and Criminal Evidence Act (PACE) has still not been replied to. Instead the day after I sent that fax letter, I was confronted by a Masonic Mafia instructed mob some wearing police uniforms and bullet proof attire and were most certainly armed. Maybe I should have given them a clear view of me and then one of their marksmen would have received a reward for putting a bullet in my head?
The evidence of my allegations has been sent , at my considerable expense, to Woolf, Irvine, Bingham and Straw. They too are now considered as being guilty of the crime of misconduct in public office. The law also applies to them though its clear they don't think it does. They are duty bound to investigate the allegations I have made most probably against their Masonic Mafia brothers. By failing to carry out that duty required of them they become guilty of the crime I have mentioned. The path they tread is not as wide as they may believe

the northen echo

Comment from The Northern Echo: The innocent need answers From the Northern Echo, first published Wednesday 3rd Apr 2002. WE sympathise with those individuals accused and subsequently cleared in Operation Rose. It is difficult to imagine the trauma of being suspected or charged with the abuse of children in your care. In the eyes of society, these are among the most serious of offences. Those involved, whether they are cleared or not, can be stigmatised for life. No one should make light of the fact that, of the 223 care workers who were the subject of allegations, only 32 people went on to face court action. Of these, only seven were convicted. But neither should we lose sight of the fact that seven people were found guilty of heinous crimes. Because of Operation Rose, they were duly punished. Without Operation Rose, they would have escaped justice, and possibly gone on to commit further offences. Nevertheless, those cleared deserve a full explanation of the actions taken by police. Now that Operation Rose has come to an end it is to be hoped that all relevant questions will be answered. If there were any shortcomings in this investigation, they must be fully examined so that lessons can be learned to assist future inquiries of this kind. It is up to the police to demonstrate that, despite the pain and suffering inflicted on the innocent, it was in the public interest to pursue the guilty

care homes



SCORES of former care home residents are suing a North council over horrific sexual, emotional and physical abuse they suffered as children. The Sunday Sun can today exclusively reveal details of the landmark legal battle . . . the biggest of its kind to ever rock the region. At present,647 men and women are involved in the case against Sunderland City Council. They are seeking compensation for abuse they allege they have suffered at care homes in the city and across the region. In all, 124 homes used by Sunderland social services to house youngsters are implicated. They include premises in Tyneside, Northumberland, County Durham and Cumbria. Solicitors say the present number of claimants is the "tip of the iceberg." They estimate the figure could at least double before next summer. Last Monday, a judge at Newcastle's Moot Hall made an order enabling the group legal action to go ahead. CLAIMS Legal experts say the cost to Sunderland City Council could run into millions. The action relates to those in care between 1960 and 1990. Some of the more severe sexual abuse claimants could win pay-outs of more than £50,000. The allegations include claims of rape plus physical and emotional abuse. There are alleged instances of up to four members of staff sitting on a child for up to an hour. There are also claims that sexual abuse by members of staff against the residents and sexual abuse between the residents was ignored. INFAMOUS Other allegations involve assaults where children were kicked in the leg, hit in the head, knocked to the ground and kicked again. The action emerged from complaints made in the 1980s about the infamous Witherwack House in Sunderland. Two workers at the home, Kevin Roffe and Glynis Tamblin, were found guilty of child cruelty at a trial which ended in 1993. Another worker, Michael Dagg, died of natural causes before the trial. Witherwack House was eventually demolished. After the initial claims, a stream of people came forward to complain. Other homes include the Wellesley Nautical School in Blyth, and Netherton Park in Morpeth, both Northumberland. Also Aycliffe Centre in Newton Aycliffe, County Durham, Stanhope Castle in Carlisle and Thorncliffe Working Boys Hostel in East Boldon, South Tyneside. Other Sunderland homes include Emsworth House, Penshaw House and The Esplanade. Cases Sunderland solicitors Richard Reed are the lead firm in the case, representing 43 claimants. At Monday's hearing, a schedule was drawn up. Then 15 lead cases will be selected and will go to trial SUFFERING Brian Puech of Richard Reed said: "There has been group litigation before. But it's the biggest there's ever been in the North East." Andrea Ribchester, also of Richard Reed, said: "This could be the tip of the iceberg. "The horrible thing is that often it wasn't just one member of a family in care, but siblings. "Families' lives have been ruined and people are still suffering now, when they are well into their 40s." A spokesman for Sunderland City Council said: "We will be continuing investigations into these claims in accordance with the timetable at the hearing." ONE man, now 33, was a resident in Witherwack House between 1979 and 1984. He claims he was locked in a room for an entire weekend, stripped naked and left on cold plastic bedding. THE man also alleges being forced into a scalding hot bath, being pinned down and having his arms shoved up behind his back to breaking point. HE also claims that his head was bashed against a radiator and that the treatment regularly drove him to contemplate suicide. ON one occasion, he locked himself in his bedroom after returning from his grandmother's funeral. HE says a member of staff broke down the door and pushed him through a window. He says he still has a three-inch scar across his wrist

police

Police leading a huge but largely abortive child abuse inquiry denied yesterday they had encouraged false allegations and wrecked the lives of innocent teachers and care workers by "trawling" for evidence in children's homes. Dozens of professionals in the north-east, backed by MPs, have lodged complaints about the blunderbuss effect of the five-year Operation Rose that saw more than 200 people investigated but in the end only six convicted. The £5m inquiry led to789claims of assault, rape and other sexual abuse from 752 residents or former residents of 230 care homes. The methods used by Northumbria police have been referred to the Commons home affairs committee, which is studying the handling of hundreds of similar child abuse allegations in care homes. The scale of the north-east inquiry has emerged with the lifting of a legal gag. The two years of reporting restrictions on the trials of 124 north-east care workers and teachers linked to 742 allegations of child abuse, ended on Tuesday with the collapse of the final case in Newcastle crown court. The legal move has cleared the way for the complaints of care workers and teachers either acquitted by juries or told by police that they would not face trial. Ray Johnson, co-chairman of the north-east branch of Falsely Accused Carers and Teachers, said that the clumsy snail's pace investigation had destroyed his life and career as it had scores of others. He has lodged papers with the police complaints authority claiming malicious prosecution and victimisation after a judge threw out charges against him because a three-and-a-half-year delay had flouted his human rights. "My life has been utterly destroyed for the past five years for no reason whatsoever," he said. "People who abuse children physically or sexually should be punished, but the methods of the Northumbria police have brought the downfall of innocent people whose only crime was to look after disaffected children in homes." John Scott, assistant chief constable of Northumbria police, defended the idea of the "trawling" system yesterday but acknowledged that it could trap the innocent. He said: "We would conduct the inquiry in the same way, were we to do it again. However, recommendations have been made to establish best practice." The police have now drawn up recommendations for child abuse inquiries involving care homes, which include "fast track" legal preparation to get cases quickly to court, and a national protocol to record unused material. There are about 8347 cases pending nationally and the Commons committee is studying a further 765 convictions of care workers and teachers dating back 30 years. The committee chair, Chris Mullin, Labour MP for Sunderland, said in January as the inquiry was set up: "It's been suggested that a new genre of miscarriage of justice has arisen from the over-enthusiastic pursuit of allegations of abuse of children in institutions. The decision to conduct this inquiry was taken in response to a large number of well argued representations." Typical among the cases of Operation Rose was that of a Esme Allenby, 54, a care worker whose life was said to be ruined by nine allegations of indecent assault. Though the police never took the claims to trial, she was devastated by the public pursuit of the claims. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Police under attack for £9m sex abuse inquiry A three-year police investigation into sexual and physical abuse at 230children's homes has been criticised after resulting in only six convictions despite well over 700 allegations against around care workers. Operation Rose was conducted by Northumbria Police, at a cost of £9million, after a woman in her twenties disclosed to a social worker that she and a friend had been abused as children in care. Initial inquiries identified six victims who alleged abuse, dating from the Sixties, by eight suspects at seven homes in four local authority areas. Police embarked on a process of "trawling" for information by writing to 4500 former residents explaining that they were looking into homes where they had once lived. As a consequence homes runs by two voluntary agencies and all six local authorities in the force area - Northumberland, Newcastle upon Tyne, North Tyneside, Gateshead, South Tyneside and Sunderland - came under investigation. A total of 760 residents and former residents made allegations against 349 care workers for alleged offences including rape, buggery, indecent assault and physical assault. Of 123 people who were charged with a total of 142 offences, five were found guilty, one pleaded guilty, 12 were found not guilty, nine had cases withdrawn, four died before their cases were heard and one remained on file. Court reporting restrictions, which previously prevented publicity of the Operation Rose trials, were lifted at the conclusion of the final case this week. Esme Allenby, 54, of Cramlington, Northumberland, was told she would not face trial for nine counts of indecent assault, dating back 27 years, which she denied. The prosecution at Newcastle Crown Court told Judge Maurice Carr that it was in the public interest that the trial did not proceed because vital documents were missing. The North-East branch of Falsely Accused Carers and Teachers, an organisation set up after instances of unproved allegations elsewhere in the country, attacked the police approach to gathering complaints. Ray Johnston, the co-chairman of Fact (North East), said: "Scores of carers and teachers have had their lives ruined and the lives of their families destroyed by these actions." Mr Johnston was suspended from his post as a senior teacher at Netherton Park in Northumberland in August 1997. He said: "I was just fully aware I hadn't done anything to justify being suspended at all and thought it was thoroughly wrong." Mr Johnston learnt from colleagues that a girl had accused him of physical assault and eight months after his suspension he was arrested and later charged with five counts of child cruelty and two of physical assaults. After years of court adjournments Mr Johnston's case was dismissed after a judge ruled that the three and a half-year delay in the case had breached his human rights. He has now submitted a complaint to the Police Complaints Authority citing victimisation and malicious prosecution. A former teacher, Derek Gordon, from Chester-le-Street, Co Durham, said Operation Rose had left him "marked for life" even though he was acquitted of child abuse charges. Northumbria Police defended Operation Rose. The assistant chief constable John Scott, said: "It was a thorough and professional investigation. Six people involved in child abuse have been put behind bars as a result of our investigations." even the press cant get facts right why was the real evedence never sumited to the judge reason freemasons the case was flawed from the begining . the nspcc got the go ahead to investigate alagation but who did they employe to doi the investigation on behalf of them.....wait...for...it... SUNDERLAND SOCIAL SERVICES yes thge very persons who wear guilty of abusing us all. i do have the final nspcc report hear and was kind of hoping fire and ice would be able to put up on the site but under no cercumstances do i want fire and ice to get into trouble a lot of my postings are comon knowlage anyhow just i belive the stuff i have hear needs to be made public and especaly fire and ice as they wear one of the first orginisations i met and gave me the courage to fight and i would like them if possible to put on thier site however legal restrictions might prevent this i am unsure. i belive the pepole of liverpool and the north east have so much in common ie operation rose and operation care and the simalaritys are uncanny when i say uncanny i mean the brick walls put up all the way etc. i am wanting to finaly realise all the dochoments i have as i am sure they can only help and fire and ice are the orginisation i hold with absolute respect i have known them a very long time and hold them in very great astem even though i am not a resedent of liverpool and distance prevales me from being thier .i still hear great and monumental things about fire and ice and one thing which means a lot i can trust them and anyone who knows me as a survivour trust is a big meaning to me. so jim/paul and the rest of the crewe i will be in touch my friends

the children

Are innocent men behind bars? Review of child abuse convictions Panorama: In The Name of The Children investigated evidence that some of the convictions of former childcare workers for abuse may be unsafe more than a year ago. In response to mounting fears about miscarriages of justice, MPs are to review the convictions of more than 100 former care workers accused of abusing children in their care over the last 30 years. The review will concentrate on concerns that police methods used in these inquiries may have produced unreliable evidence. It has been suggested a whole new genre of miscarriages of justice has arisen Chris Mullins MP Panorama investigated the validity of police inquiry methods, particularly the use of "trawling" where officers inform former care home residents they are following up abuse allegations against an individual. Financial compensation This prompted fears that people are encouraged to fabricate claims in order to receive financial compensation. The Home Affairs Select Committee will also examine the role of the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) in bringing sex abuse charges against individuals. Committee Chairman Chris Mullins, Labour MP for Sunderland South, said: "It has been suggested that a whole new genre of miscarriages of justice has arisen from the over-enthusiastic pursuit of allegations about the abuse of children in institutions many years ago." The committee will also consider whether a time limit on prosecution for child abuse should be imposed. do not trust chris mullen

mp

A leading MP has called for a public inquiry into the sexual abuse suffered by inmates at a North East detention centre. On Tuesday, a Chronicle probe revealed shocking evidence about the targeting of young offenders at Medomsley Detention Centre in the 1970s and 1980s. The scandal of the `short, sharp, shock' centre, in Consett, County Durham, emerged when ex-kitchen officer Neville Husband was convicted of molesting a string of boys. But papers unearthed by us provided a catalogue of fresh revelations. We told how married father-of-one Husband, 69, of Shotley Bridge, Durham, had been probed for importing child pornography 10 years before working at Medomsley, and prison officer police statements told how they suspected Husband was abusing boys but were afraid to speak up to bosses. Tyneside North MP Stephen Byers has a victim of Husband's brutal regime living in his constituency, and this has led to him pressing the Home Office for a fresh probe into what happened at Medomsley. In a question to Parliament, Mr Byers wrote: "To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will establish an independent and public inquiry into the abuse of inmates at the Medomsley Detention Centre in County Durham between 1970 and 1990." Mr Byers has been told there are a number of compensation claims being lodged against the Home Office by victims of Husband, which means an inquiry will not be launched at this stage. But he also wants a review of the law which governs when child sex abuse victims can launch compensation bids. He has lodged a second question to the Lord Chancellor, set to be answered on Tuesday, which reads: "If he will review the provisions of the Limitations Act 1980 in so far as they apply to victims of child sexual abuse." There have already been wrangles over the Limitation Act in relation to abuse suffered at Medomsley. Victim Kevin Young, of Jarrow, South Tyneside, has waived his right to anonymity to speak out. He was brutally targeted by Husband in 1977 while serving a three-month sentence. Mr Young was granted the right to pursue a compensation claim by Leeds Crown Court in November. But last month, an appeal court judge over-ruled the decision, saying too much time had passed between him knowing about the assault and lodging a claim. Now he hopes pressure from MPs will help bring about a change in the law and get justice for him and other victims. Mr Young said: "I have always said, it's not about money or anything like that. "It's about getting accountability for what went on. I believe people knew what was going on in there but did nothing. "Also, I should never even have met Husband because he shouldn't have been working as a crown officer after being investigated for importing child pornography. "Although he was not prosecuted back in 1967, this clearly showed he had an unhealthy interest in young men sexually." Our investigation revealed Husband had claimed he was writing a book about homosexuality when he was caught with the pornography. Other revelations include he had regular shipments of pornography sent to Medomsley. We also lifted the lid on the fact a second officer was convicted of assaulting another inmate. "After Husband was taken down to the cells ready to go to prison, at the end of his trial, the judge Esmond Faulks had it in his power to have those who were in charge of Medomsley Detention Centre arrested, as well as all those officers who knew what was happening and did nothing to stop it, deciding to destroy all evidence of his crimes and cover up any link back to husband." Blog "THE LAW AND EVIDENCE" Mr Young, 45, said: "I've said from the start, this is not about money. It is about the principle that people knew this was going on but nothing was done about it. The experience left him mentally scarred, and he was determined to help bring his tormentors to justice. This started when police officers asked him to tell his story back in 1998 as part of the operation rose years ago. The evidence and testimonies of the many victims and other prison officers from Medomsley at the time Neville Husband was there, were instrumental in bringing him to justice. Jurors heard how Husband used intimidation and fear to ensure the silence of his detention centre victims, all from damaged backgrounds. Judge Esmond Faulks told him: "Their fear of you caused them to submit to your unwelcome attentions and this was in my judgement a gross breach of trust. You and others like you helped cause their damaged personalities. Until now they never thought anyone would believe them. After the case, Det Insp Simon Orton, who led the Durham Police investigation, said he was delighted by the outcome of the case. “It is clear this man feasted himself on these young men who were in his charge," he said. "I hope that this will bring closure for the victims. I have no doubt in my mind their lives will always be affected by what happened in Medomsley. My thoughts are very much with the victims still. DI Orton said: "He has never acknowledged any guilt." “They have been very brave." Following the news coverage of his first trial, that Neville Husband was called back to court. More than seven new victims had come forward, and he eventually pleaded guilty and what’s more dropped his appeal against his original 10 year sentence. Tim Newell was Governor from 1979 to 1981 at Medomsley. He was at Grendon prison as well as the architect of the restorative justice reforms. He says in his statement… “About five years after leaving Medomsley I was on a course at the Prison Training College at Wakefield, when I bumped into a Medomsley colleague John McBee. John told me that Neville had to leave the service over an allegation that he had abused a boy.” That would make it around 1985/86 when Husband, “Had to leave the service over an allegation that he had abused a boy.” In 1985/86, after being forced to leave Medomsley then got a promotion to senior officer at the Frankland Maximum security prison in Co Durham. Martin Narey was the governor at the Frankland from 1986 to 89, and the governor when Husband was promoted to a senior officer as ‘punishment’ for being caught sexually abusing boys. "Public Relations" Mr. Byers: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will establish an independent and public inquiry into the abuse of inmates at the Medomsley Detention Centre in County Durham between 1970 and 1990. [69466] Mr. Sutcliffe[holding answer 9 May 2006]: The Government are aware of outstanding civil claims relating to abuse of prisoners at the Medomsley detention centre which closed in 1983. While these civil actions are ongoing it would be inappropriate to comment on any calls for a public inquiry. Gerry Sutcliffe, parliamentary Under-Secretary for the Home Office is aware of outstanding civil claims relating to abuse of prisoners at the Medomsley detention centre which closed in 1983. His view is that while these civil actions are ongoing it would be inappropriate to comment on any calls for a public inquiry. “A cash boost in May this year thanks to £1.25million funding for voluntary and community organisations throughout England and Wales, announced Home Office Minister Gerry Sutcliffe. "Sexual crimes can result in high levels of distress and can be the most damaging physically and emotionally. This funding will help to ensure that victims of these terrible offences have timely access to advice, information, care and counselling that meets their individual needs no matter where they are in the country. "I am determined that the needs of victims of crime must be better met and this funding is part of a wider programme of Government initiatives to put the needs of those affected by crime central in the criminal justice system." This is what Gerry Sutcliff says in public; however when in private he is as bad as the abusers. He is allowing the suffering of all the victims from Medomsley to continue, and has failed to respond adequately to calls for a public inquiry into Medomsley Detention Centre and the decades of sexual torture many young kids were put through. The sexual abuse of a child is a uniquely horrible crime, because it destroys the child's sense of him or herself and undermines the capacity to trust. The fact that this crime is usually carried trusted and respected adults of some standing, makes the damage worse. Mr. Young, says that it is not just him, but other Medomsley claimants are still locked in an ongoing high court case against the Home Office. Mr Young, from York, said: "I saw some things that nobody should have to see as a young person. Governors of the Medomsley Detention Centre and their senior management "were aware of what was happening" at the centre and "failed to stop or act upon, in accordance with the prison protocols of that time." Many if not all of the vulnerable youths were from broken homes and fractured backgrounds. They took on the baggage of being in the care system, where they were also sexually and physically abused, not to mention ill educated. This was the only alternative to being looked after by the church. And we all know where that leads. In fact the Medomsley Detention Centre annual report of 1977 says it all... 1977 inspection report described Medomsley as `Dickensian' and read: "The detention centre has never hit the headlines and within the Prison Department has apparently been accepted as a place where nothing of any import ever occurs and one which is unlikely to cause any problems." I believe Husband had access to all the records about the inmates he chose to serve in his kitchen; he used these to great effect. I also believe that he was not!! allowed to have access to these private documents that were for the eyes of the governor and senior officers only ad he would use these to make his decision on who he could abuse. Who has little contact with the outside world? Who doesn’t have parents? How many come directly from the care system or had abusive parents? In Medomsley, we would start work early as we had to get all the breakfasts ready for all the other inmates. Husband would always be there, almost superimposed on every synapse of each young mind in his charge. He had enormity and presence in his own kingdom. I’ll not bother telling you how breakfasts were in Medomsley … sufficed to they were fast! Everything worked that way in places like that. Once you were at work, Husband would make an excuse to get past you while you were, lets say, tending the potato peeling machine. As he did so he would press his penis towards your backside fleetingly then carry on what he was doing. On the way back he would do the same thing only with more gusto, and we all knew what might follow. He would sense everything from the initial contact in the dining hall, where he would inspect the newest intake to the centre that day, and then he’d choose who would work in the kitchen. All his victims were threatened with their lives. Neville Husband laid claim to being in the Military and was trained to kill. “You could disappear in places like this and nobody would ever know.” “You could be buried in the bottom sports field and nobody would care.” "Betrayal" The UK's most vulnerable children are being "betrayed" by a care system that is guilty of a catalogue of failings, according to a damning report. The majority of young people leaving institutions are destined to become prostitutes, homeless or spend time in prison, the study states. Harriet Sergeant, author of ‘Handle with Care: an investigation into the care system’, said: "It is not just a tragedy for the individual. A successful system of care would transform this country. "At a stroke it would empty a third of our prisons. It would halve the number of prostitutes, reduce by between a third and a half the number of homeless and remove 80% of Big Issue sellers from our street corners. "Not only is our system failing the young people in care, it is failing society and perpetuating an underclass." The report says that out of the 6,000 people who leave care on average every year, 75% (4,500) will have no educational qualifications and within two years 50% will be unemployed, while 20% (1,200) will be homeless. Just one out of a hundred will make it to university. In the year ending March 31 2005, 60,900 children were taken in care - most placed with foster parents or in children's homes. Failings of the care system included children being moved among foster carers too often, and homes focusing on short-term containment rather then the long-term well-being of the youngsters. The report concluded the system should be reformed to provide "secure, stable, long-term and loving care for difficult children". New initiatives that might help children should be explored and young people should be tracked after leaving care in order to build up a true picture of how the system was working, it added. Hugh Bayley MP for York is supporting Mr Young in calling for a full and independent inquiry into the sexual abuse of inmates at the Medomsley Detention Centre... "Hypocrisy" One would think the Crown and its employees could not act with absolute carelessness and abandon. One would think that it has sufficient morals of the sort that bind humanity together, yet the above comments show that this is far from the truth. Even today, despite the sector’s growth in statistical knowledge and greater education, young people are still not tracked after leaving care. A public servant is allowed to continue sexually assaulting children with absolute and total impunity. The authorities, being in full knowledge of these horrors are allowed to escape liability for the damage done whilst simultaneously, those same authorities don’t hesitate to punish a child for stealing a watch. It is clear from what has happened, that carelessness and abandon are words that do describe the actions of the Crown and those public servants who are only there at all because they have our trust. We the undersigned hope that you can bring these matters to light in an effective way. This will make a difference not only to us, but the thousands of other abuse survivors whose abuse originated from being in the care of government institutions. To this end, we will be cooperative in any projects you wish to propose that we feel are for the greater good. Kevin Young suffered at the hands of Husband, while he was serving a short sentence at the Medomsley Detention Centre, Consett, Co Durham in 1977. The Home Office ran the detention centre where Husband worked. Mr Young decided to take the authorities to task, and despite the Home Office’s attempt to block the move, Mr Young won his hearing in Leeds against the Home Office last year. This case is now a landmark legal case that allows Kevin Young to launch a bid for compensation. The Home Office tried to get the case thrown out, and their plea was that too much time has passed since the crimes occurred. This has customarily worked well as a defence for child abusers in the past, as the 1980 Limitation Act states claims for compensation need to be lodged three years after attacks took place. But Mr Young's legal team argued there was provision for people to lodge claims three years after the "date of knowledge". Abuse victims may not realise how badly they have been harmed until years after the attacks took place. "Manifestly unjust and oppressive" The current laws of statute in the United Kingdom are “Manifestly unjust and oppressive” because it not only continues the victimisation of all survivors of sexual abuse, it helps influential high ranking professionals and the people that serve them to manipulate the law and favour their friends and employees when and if they have litigation levied against them as well as to keep these malfeasant dysfunctional people from the public’s knowledge allowing them to continue abusing the young and vulnerable. This is clearly seen in the young v Catholic Care & Home office, case when Edward Faulks QC attempted to snip a little bit off the top of one statute and stick it onto another so he could have the statute the way he wanted it. However one of the judges says you cant just remove part of a statute and attach it to another “It doesn’t work like that.” Here we are sitting in a courtroom listening to this man trying to protect the church and the home office at all costs when all the time he knew that the facts of the case were true and with his statement at the very beginning of the proceedings “We neither accept nor do we deny the offences took place,” Strange thing to say when there has been two trials and guilty plea’s handed to a crown court and the perpetrator of the crimes is in prison serving 10 years.. "Minister for Constitutional Affairs, David Lammy" THE Home Office and Roman Catholic Church are appealing against a York abuse victim's landmark legal victory. Kevin Young was allowed by a judge last autumn to press ahead with suing the two organisations over alleged abuse at two children's homes, including one near Tadcaster. But the decision, which could pave the way for thousands of other abuse victims to sue for compensation, will be overturned if the Government and church succeed at a Court of Appeal hearing later this year. Their appeal is based on the 1980 Limitation Act, under which claims for compensation need to be lodged within three years of an incident. Mr Young, 45, successfully argued at Leeds County Court that he had been so badly affected psychologically by assaults that he had not fully realised the significance of any injury until much later. His solicitor, David Greenwood, argued there was provision in the Act to allow people to pursue claims from a "date of knowledge". Lawyers for Catholic Care, in the Diocese of Leeds, say in their skeleton argument to the Court of Appeal that the case raised important questions about the proper approach to limitation in abuse cases, and argue that the judge reached the wrong conclusions. But Mr Young said he was winning growing support from senior MPs for a change in the limitations law in abuse cases. York MP Hugh Bayley told him he had written to the then Minister for Constitutional Affairs, David Lammy, to support such changes, which had been recommended by the Law Commission several years before. Mr Bayley has now written to Mr Lammy's successor, Bridget Prentice, to find what progress has been made in implementing the Law Commission's recommendations. The MP said in his letter to the minister that the Government had accepted the recommendations in principle in July 2002, and that he understood legislation would be introduced when a "suitable legislative opportunity arises." Mr Young, who works for justice4survivors.org, was abused by Neville Husband while he was serving a short sentence at Medomsley Detention Centre in the north-east in 1977 for burglary and handling stolen goods. Husband was jailed in 2003. Mr Young's claim against Catholic Care, of the church's Leeds diocese, is based on allegations he was abused while staying in the 1970s at St Camillus, a children's home at Scarthingwell, near Tadcaster, for which the church had responsibility. He said his aim in taking on the case is not just about winning damages, but to establish the Statute of Limitations should not be allowed to prevent victims of child abuse seeking damages later on in their lives. Updated: 09:42 Wednesday, March 08, 2006

mp

A leading MP has called for a public inquiry into the sexual abuse suffered by inmates at a North East detention centre. On Tuesday, a Chronicle probe revealed shocking evidence about the targeting of young offenders at Medomsley Detention Centre in the 1970s and 1980s. The scandal of the `short, sharp, shock' centre, in Consett, County Durham, emerged when ex-kitchen officer Neville Husband was convicted of molesting a string of boys. But papers unearthed by us provided a catalogue of fresh revelations. We told how married father-of-one Husband, 69, of Shotley Bridge, Durham, had been probed for importing child pornography 10 years before working at Medomsley, and prison officer police statements told how they suspected Husband was abusing boys but were afraid to speak up to bosses. Tyneside North MP Stephen Byers has a victim of Husband's brutal regime living in his constituency, and this has led to him pressing the Home Office for a fresh probe into what happened at Medomsley. In a question to Parliament, Mr Byers wrote: "To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will establish an independent and public inquiry into the abuse of inmates at the Medomsley Detention Centre in County Durham between 1970 and 1990." Mr Byers has been told there are a number of compensation claims being lodged against the Home Office by victims of Husband, which means an inquiry will not be launched at this stage. But he also wants a review of the law which governs when child sex abuse victims can launch compensation bids. He has lodged a second question to the Lord Chancellor, set to be answered on Tuesday, which reads: "If he will review the provisions of the Limitations Act 1980 in so far as they apply to victims of child sexual abuse." There have already been wrangles over the Limitation Act in relation to abuse suffered at Medomsley. Victim Kevin Young, of Jarrow, South Tyneside, has waived his right to anonymity to speak out. He was brutally targeted by Husband in 1977 while serving a three-month sentence. Mr Young was granted the right to pursue a compensation claim by Leeds Crown Court in November. But last month, an appeal court judge over-ruled the decision, saying too much time had passed between him knowing about the assault and lodging a claim. Now he hopes pressure from MPs will help bring about a change in the law and get justice for him and other victims. Mr Young said: "I have always said, it's not about money or anything like that. "It's about getting accountability for what went on. I believe people knew what was going on in there but did nothing. "Also, I should never even have met Husband because he shouldn't have been working as a crown officer after being investigated for importing child pornography. "Although he was not prosecuted back in 1967, this clearly showed he had an unhealthy interest in young men sexually." Our investigation revealed Husband had claimed he was writing a book about homosexuality when he was caught with the pornography. Other revelations include he had regular shipments of pornography sent to Medomsley. We also lifted the lid on the fact a second officer was convicted of assaulting another inmate. "After Husband was taken down to the cells ready to go to prison, at the end of his trial, the judge Esmond Faulks had it in his power to have those who were in charge of Medomsley Detention Centre arrested, as well as all those officers who knew what was happening and did nothing to stop it, deciding to destroy all evidence of his crimes and cover up any link back to husband." Blog "THE LAW AND EVIDENCE" Mr Young, 45, said: "I've said from the start, this is not about money. It is about the principle that people knew this was going on but nothing was done about it. The experience left him mentally scarred, and he was determined to help bring his tormentors to justice. This started when police officers asked him to tell his story back in 1998 as part of the operation rose years ago. The evidence and testimonies of the many victims and other prison officers from Medomsley at the time Neville Husband was there, were instrumental in bringing him to justice. Jurors heard how Husband used intimidation and fear to ensure the silence of his detention centre victims, all from damaged backgrounds. Judge Esmond Faulks told him: "Their fear of you caused them to submit to your unwelcome attentions and this was in my judgement a gross breach of trust. You and others like you helped cause their damaged personalities. Until now they never thought anyone would believe them. After the case, Det Insp Simon Orton, who led the Durham Police investigation, said he was delighted by the outcome of the case. “It is clear this man feasted himself on these young men who were in his charge," he said. "I hope that this will bring closure for the victims. I have no doubt in my mind their lives will always be affected by what happened in Medomsley. My thoughts are very much with the victims still. DI Orton said: "He has never acknowledged any guilt." “They have been very brave." Following the news coverage of his first trial, that Neville Husband was called back to court. More than seven new victims had come forward, and he eventually pleaded guilty and what’s more dropped his appeal against his original 10 year sentence. Tim Newell was Governor from 1979 to 1981 at Medomsley. He was at Grendon prison as well as the architect of the restorative justice reforms. He says in his statement… “About five years after leaving Medomsley I was on a course at the Prison Training College at Wakefield, when I bumped into a Medomsley colleague John McBee. John told me that Neville had to leave the service over an allegation that he had abused a boy.” That would make it around 1985/86 when Husband, “Had to leave the service over an allegation that he had abused a boy.” In 1985/86, after being forced to leave Medomsley then got a promotion to senior officer at the Frankland Maximum security prison in Co Durham. Martin Narey was the governor at the Frankland from 1986 to 89, and the governor when Husband was promoted to a senior officer as ‘punishment’ for being caught sexually abusing boys. "Public Relations" Mr. Byers: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will establish an independent and public inquiry into the abuse of inmates at the Medomsley Detention Centre in County Durham between 1970 and 1990. [69466] Mr. Sutcliffe[holding answer 9 May 2006]: The Government are aware of outstanding civil claims relating to abuse of prisoners at the Medomsley detention centre which closed in 1983. While these civil actions are ongoing it would be inappropriate to comment on any calls for a public inquiry. Gerry Sutcliffe, parliamentary Under-Secretary for the Home Office is aware of outstanding civil claims relating to abuse of prisoners at the Medomsley detention centre which closed in 1983. His view is that while these civil actions are ongoing it would be inappropriate to comment on any calls for a public inquiry. “A cash boost in May this year thanks to £1.25million funding for voluntary and community organisations throughout England and Wales, announced Home Office Minister Gerry Sutcliffe. "Sexual crimes can result in high levels of distress and can be the most damaging physically and emotionally. This funding will help to ensure that victims of these terrible offences have timely access to advice, information, care and counselling that meets their individual needs no matter where they are in the country. "I am determined that the needs of victims of crime must be better met and this funding is part of a wider programme of Government initiatives to put the needs of those affected by crime central in the criminal justice system." This is what Gerry Sutcliff says in public; however when in private he is as bad as the abusers. He is allowing the suffering of all the victims from Medomsley to continue, and has failed to respond adequately to calls for a public inquiry into Medomsley Detention Centre and the decades of sexual torture many young kids were put through. The sexual abuse of a child is a uniquely horrible crime, because it destroys the child's sense of him or herself and undermines the capacity to trust. The fact that this crime is usually carried trusted and respected adults of some standing, makes the damage worse. Mr. Young, says that it is not just him, but other Medomsley claimants are still locked in an ongoing high court case against the Home Office. Mr Young, from York, said: "I saw some things that nobody should have to see as a young person. Governors of the Medomsley Detention Centre and their senior management "were aware of what was happening" at the centre and "failed to stop or act upon, in accordance with the prison protocols of that time." Many if not all of the vulnerable youths were from broken homes and fractured backgrounds. They took on the baggage of being in the care system, where they were also sexually and physically abused, not to mention ill educated. This was the only alternative to being looked after by the church. And we all know where that leads. In fact the Medomsley Detention Centre annual report of 1977 says it all... 1977 inspection report described Medomsley as `Dickensian' and read: "The detention centre has never hit the headlines and within the Prison Department has apparently been accepted as a place where nothing of any import ever occurs and one which is unlikely to cause any problems." I believe Husband had access to all the records about the inmates he chose to serve in his kitchen; he used these to great effect. I also believe that he was not!! allowed to have access to these private documents that were for the eyes of the governor and senior officers only ad he would use these to make his decision on who he could abuse. Who has little contact with the outside world? Who doesn’t have parents? How many come directly from the care system or had abusive parents? In Medomsley, we would start work early as we had to get all the breakfasts ready for all the other inmates. Husband would always be there, almost superimposed on every synapse of each young mind in his charge. He had enormity and presence in his own kingdom. I’ll not bother telling you how breakfasts were in Medomsley … sufficed to they were fast! Everything worked that way in places like that. Once you were at work, Husband would make an excuse to get past you while you were, lets say, tending the potato peeling machine. As he did so he would press his penis towards your backside fleetingly then carry on what he was doing. On the way back he would do the same thing only with more gusto, and we all knew what might follow. He would sense everything from the initial contact in the dining hall, where he would inspect the newest intake to the centre that day, and then he’d choose who would work in the kitchen. All his victims were threatened with their lives. Neville Husband laid claim to being in the Military and was trained to kill. “You could disappear in places like this and nobody would ever know.” “You could be buried in the bottom sports field and nobody would care.” "Betrayal" The UK's most vulnerable children are being "betrayed" by a care system that is guilty of a catalogue of failings, according to a damning report. The majority of young people leaving institutions are destined to become prostitutes, homeless or spend time in prison, the study states. Harriet Sergeant, author of ‘Handle with Care: an investigation into the care system’, said: "It is not just a tragedy for the individual. A successful system of care would transform this country. "At a stroke it would empty a third of our prisons. It would halve the number of prostitutes, reduce by between a third and a half the number of homeless and remove 80% of Big Issue sellers from our street corners. "Not only is our system failing the young people in care, it is failing society and perpetuating an underclass." The report says that out of the 6,000 people who leave care on average every year, 75% (4,500) will have no educational qualifications and within two years 50% will be unemployed, while 20% (1,200) will be homeless. Just one out of a hundred will make it to university. In the year ending March 31 2005, 60,900 children were taken in care - most placed with foster parents or in children's homes. Failings of the care system included children being moved among foster carers too often, and homes focusing on short-term containment rather then the long-term well-being of the youngsters. The report concluded the system should be reformed to provide "secure, stable, long-term and loving care for difficult children". New initiatives that might help children should be explored and young people should be tracked after leaving care in order to build up a true picture of how the system was working, it added. Hugh Bayley MP for York is supporting Mr Young in calling for a full and independent inquiry into the sexual abuse of inmates at the Medomsley Detention Centre... "Hypocrisy" One would think the Crown and its employees could not act with absolute carelessness and abandon. One would think that it has sufficient morals of the sort that bind humanity together, yet the above comments show that this is far from the truth. Even today, despite the sector’s growth in statistical knowledge and greater education, young people are still not tracked after leaving care. A public servant is allowed to continue sexually assaulting children with absolute and total impunity. The authorities, being in full knowledge of these horrors are allowed to escape liability for the damage done whilst simultaneously, those same authorities don’t hesitate to punish a child for stealing a watch. It is clear from what has happened, that carelessness and abandon are words that do describe the actions of the Crown and those public servants who are only there at all because they have our trust. We the undersigned hope that you can bring these matters to light in an effective way. This will make a difference not only to us, but the thousands of other abuse survivors whose abuse originated from being in the care of government institutions. To this end, we will be cooperative in any projects you wish to propose that we feel are for the greater good. Kevin Young suffered at the hands of Husband, while he was serving a short sentence at the Medomsley Detention Centre, Consett, Co Durham in 1977. The Home Office ran the detention centre where Husband worked. Mr Young decided to take the authorities to task, and despite the Home Office’s attempt to block the move, Mr Young won his hearing in Leeds against the Home Office last year. This case is now a landmark legal case that allows Kevin Young to launch a bid for compensation. The Home Office tried to get the case thrown out, and their plea was that too much time has passed since the crimes occurred. This has customarily worked well as a defence for child abusers in the past, as the 1980 Limitation Act states claims for compensation need to be lodged three years after attacks took place. But Mr Young's legal team argued there was provision for people to lodge claims three years after the "date of knowledge". Abuse victims may not realise how badly they have been harmed until years after the attacks took place. "Manifestly unjust and oppressive" The current laws of statute in the United Kingdom are “Manifestly unjust and oppressive” because it not only continues the victimisation of all survivors of sexual abuse, it helps influential high ranking professionals and the people that serve them to manipulate the law and favour their friends and employees when and if they have litigation levied against them as well as to keep these malfeasant dysfunctional people from the public’s knowledge allowing them to continue abusing the young and vulnerable. This is clearly seen in the young v Catholic Care & Home office, case when Edward Faulks QC attempted to snip a little bit off the top of one statute and stick it onto another so he could have the statute the way he wanted it. However one of the judges says you cant just remove part of a statute and attach it to another “It doesn’t work like that.” Here we are sitting in a courtroom listening to this man trying to protect the church and the home office at all costs when all the time he knew that the facts of the case were true and with his statement at the very beginning of the proceedings “We neither accept nor do we deny the offences took place,” Strange thing to say when there has been two trials and guilty plea’s handed to a crown court and the perpetrator of the crimes is in prison serving 10 years.. "Minister for Constitutional Affairs, David Lammy" THE Home Office and Roman Catholic Church are appealing against a York abuse victim's landmark legal victory. Kevin Young was allowed by a judge last autumn to press ahead with suing the two organisations over alleged abuse at two children's homes, including one near Tadcaster. But the decision, which could pave the way for thousands of other abuse victims to sue for compensation, will be overturned if the Government and church succeed at a Court of Appeal hearing later this year. Their appeal is based on the 1980 Limitation Act, under which claims for compensation need to be lodged within three years of an incident. Mr Young, 45, successfully argued at Leeds County Court that he had been so badly affected psychologically by assaults that he had not fully realised the significance of any injury until much later. His solicitor, David Greenwood, argued there was provision in the Act to allow people to pursue claims from a "date of knowledge". Lawyers for Catholic Care, in the Diocese of Leeds, say in their skeleton argument to the Court of Appeal that the case raised important questions about the proper approach to limitation in abuse cases, and argue that the judge reached the wrong conclusions. But Mr Young said he was winning growing support from senior MPs for a change in the limitations law in abuse cases. York MP Hugh Bayley told him he had written to the then Minister for Constitutional Affairs, David Lammy, to support such changes, which had been recommended by the Law Commission several years before. Mr Bayley has now written to Mr Lammy's successor, Bridget Prentice, to find what progress has been made in implementing the Law Commission's recommendations. The MP said in his letter to the minister that the Government had accepted the recommendations in principle in July 2002, and that he understood legislation would be introduced when a "suitable legislative opportunity arises." Mr Young, who works for justice4survivors.org, was abused by Neville Husband while he was serving a short sentence at Medomsley Detention Centre in the north-east in 1977 for burglary and handling stolen goods. Husband was jailed in 2003. Mr Young's claim against Catholic Care, of the church's Leeds diocese, is based on allegations he was abused while staying in the 1970s at St Camillus, a children's home at Scarthingwell, near Tadcaster, for which the church had responsibility. He said his aim in taking on the case is not just about winning damages, but to establish the Statute of Limitations should not be allowed to prevent victims of child abuse seeking damages later on in their lives. Updated: 09:42 Wednesday, March 08, 2006

grim revelations

Grim revelations today lift the lid on the shocking scale of sex abuse at a former North East Borstal. It was meant to give young offenders a short, sharp shock. Instead, many were left scarred for life, haunted by a brutal catalogue of sex attacks. The abuse of inmates at the Medomsley Detention Centre, in Consett, County Durham, came to light when former kitchen officer Neville Husband was convicted of molesting a string of young lads in the 1970s and 1980s. But today, fresh revelations expose the shocking scale of the abuse suffered behind the bars of the now-closed juvenile jail. Secret papers obtained by the Chronicle state that prison officers suspected married father-of-one Husband was preying on inmates but did nothing. Documents hidden for nearly 40 years reveal Husband, who went on to become a church minister in Gateshead, had been investigated for importing child pornography a decade before he staged his attacks. Statements by ex-colleagues tell how the 69-year-old, currently serving a 10-year jail term, had regular shipments of hardcore porn sent to him at Medomsley. And a second officer was also convicted of indecently assaulting a male prisoner, who had been introduced to him by Husband, of Shotley Bridge. The pair continued to visit and abuse the same boy after he was released from custody. Transcripts of police interviews also reveal thousands of indecent pictures of children were found on computers seized from Husband's home and his United Reformed Church office. Medomsley Detention Centre was built in 1898 but wasn't acquired by the Prison Commission until 1959. Employing just 11 staff, a 1977 inspection report described Medomsley as `Dickensian' and read: "The detention centre has never hit the headlines and within the Prison Department has apparently been accepted as a place where nothing of any import ever occurs and one which is unlikely to cause any problems." Husband, now dubbed the `Medomsley monster', worked at the jail as a kitchen officer. After 27 years in the prison service, he became a United Reformed Church minister in Gateshead in 1994. But it was not until 2001 that his perverted past came back to haunt him. Previously silenced by shame, some of his victims spoke out about the ordeal they suffered decades earlier. Husband was convicted by a Newcastle Crown Court jury of molesting five boys and jailed for eight years. Publicity surrounding the trial encouraged others to come forward and he was jailed for a further two years on additional charges. But now we can reveal Husband's depraved interest in young boys was apparent years earlier. A report reveals police probed Husband for importing homosexual pornographic pictures while working at a borstal in Dorset. The document, signed by the governor of HM Borstal Portland, reads: "The police showed me sample photographs of men in obscene and lewd postures, a signed order form and a signed cheque for 20/- which they allege was sent to an address in Sweden by Officer Husband. "The police interviewed Officer Husband at Portland police station and he admitted sending for a series of photographs, the sample of the series he ordered pictured two naked men, apparently engaged in homosexual activity. Immediately following the police interview Husband saw me privately and informed me of the statement he had made to the police. He told me - and the police - that he was considering writing a book on homosexuality and he had sent for the photos to assist to this end. Officer Husband is a good cook and baker, a married man with one child, buff, hearty and something of a comedian." A second document dated July 1967 reveals no further action was taken by the police and Husband was allowed to continue working with children in the prison service. The allegations made against him in 1967 were brought up again when he was quizzed regarding sex abuse claims in 2001. We have accessed a transcript of a police interview with Husband, during which he admits the pornography he imported showed images of children. An officer from Consett police station asks him: "And I understand that while you were in Portland, an investigation took place regarding you importing pornographic pictures of teenage boys, is that correct?" Husband replies: "There was, yes there was." Seconds later, Husband, who claimed he was writing a book about homosexuality, adds: "The pornography at that time was, it was soft porn, but again I wasn't aware that it was boys because you got sent what you got sent." The deputy governor at Portland while Husband was investigated, James Millar Reid, went on to become the governor at Medomsley. Statements given to police by prison officers who worked with Husband suggest suspicions were rife about his cravings for young boys, who he went on to molest in the kitchens he ran. One by an officer who served at Medomsley in 1978, reads: "I don't know why but all the governors thought very highly of Husband and seemed to look after him. "For example, on a regular basis on rotation we would thoroughly search various areas within the centre. This was to look for cigarettes and alcohol. All main areas of the prison were searched except for the kitchen area. The prison management would not allow anyone but Husband to have access to the kitchen area." After Husband left Medomsley, a search of the kitchen quarters discovered sex toys, pornography and rubber underwear in a filing cabinet. Victims' statements, many of which are too distressing for us to print, detail how Husband abused them in the kitchen area. The officer's statement adds: "There were always very strong rumours that Neville Husband was homosexual and that he was sexually abusing boys who were working with him in the kitchen. This was general knowledge among staff and boys in the centre. "On a night time Husband would usually keep one boy back with him after the others had been dismissed and we all felt sorry for that boy. Nobody reported their suspicions to anyone because Husband was so close to, and seemed to be supported by the governors and senior management." Another officer told how he had to take time off work because of Husband's "overbearing attitude" and that he was "too scared" to report rumours of him abusing boys. Our dossier also reveals Husband arranged for pornography to be sent to him. A statement given to police by one of his ex-colleagues reads: "For some time I was employed as a gate officer and was surprised to see Husband was receiving large quantities of post containing homosexual pornography. "Sometime the envelopes were not sealed and I used to look at the magazines and burn them without telling Husband. One package contained a video. I looked at this and found it was hardcore gay porn, again I burned it." A number of former Medomsley workers have told how Husband's closest friend in the jail was a store man called Leslie Johnston who has also been convicted of indecent assault on an inmate at the detention centre. He revealed this while being interviewed by police in the run-up to Husband's trial. It states: "After a while, Neville and I became quite good friends. We had a mutual interest in religion." He adds: "We joined the freemasons at Chop well and got on quite well together. We sometimes went out together with our wives to social functions." Johnston's statement went on: "At one stage I think Neville suggested that he had a lad working in the kitchen who he thought would be suitable to assist me in the stores department. Whilst XXXX was working with me in the stores I developed a sexual relationship with him." He adds: "As a result of this I was convicted at court of indecent assault and subsequently left the prison service." In the same statement, Johnston tells how he knew Husband had abused the same boy and that the pair both visited the victim once he had been released from prison. Husband was interviewed by police on a number of occasions. The transcript of one quiz, seen by us, tell how explicit videos of children were taken from his house in 1999. In September 2001, he was arrested on suspicion of possessing indecent photographs of children. His home PC, disks, zip-disks and a laptop from the United Reformed Church office on Cromer Avenue, Gateshead, had all been seized. During the interview, Husband is told detectives discovered thousands of indecent images of children, some of which were stored on disks labelled with phoney titles relating to church business. The Home Office declines to comment on our investigation. No-one at the United Reformed Church was available for comment. Victims of preacher Victims of Neville Husband today told of their horror at the revelations about his past. Kevin Young, of Jarrow, South Tyneside, suffered at the hands of Husband when he was sent to Medomsley for handling a stolen watch in 1977. Mr Young, now 45, was brutally targeted by Husband, including being photographed while he lay bound, blindfold, and naked. He said: "When I left that place I was shocked and shaken but I'm even more shocked and shaken at what has come out now. "These papers show officers saying things like `I felt sorry for that boy', but I don't think sorry is good enough." The true horror of the ordeal Mr Young suffered didn't hit him until he had a chance encounter with Husband in York in 1996. He bravely spoke out against the pervert preacher and after watching Husband get jailed for the attacks, he launched a bid for compensation against the Home Office. Despite winning a landmark legal victory allowing him to sue last November, the ruling was overturned earlier this month, meaning he will go without a penny. Now, dad-of-one Mr Young is calling for a full public inquiry into the case. Mr Young added: "The judge in November described this as a `serious case involving crown officers' and that's what it was. "The truth of the matter is I should never have been subjected to the attacks I was subjected to in light of what was known about him in 1967 in that he had an unhealthy interest in young boys." Mr Young is urging any other victims to contact his support group Justice4Survivors.org Another former inmate Richard Hall has also waived his right to anonymity to talk to the Chronicle. Mr Hall, now 43, of Heaton, Newcastle, was sexually abused and beaten senseless by Husband in 1980. Today, he said: "It never goes away but it's right these things come out because people need to know. "It seems from these papers that there are some people who might have suspected what was going on all along, which leaves a nasty taste to say the least. "It's the other victims who perhaps haven't come forward I worry about." Kevin young goes to say: Hi everyone, Hope all is well with you; I don’t really know where to start so I will start off by saying thank you for your support to all the victims of Neville Husband. As you may know on the 21 September 2005 Former Her Majesty’s Prison Officer Neville Husband jailed for sexually abusing vulnerable teenagers at a North detention centre has admitted further attacks on inmates. Husband was convicted in 2003 of indecently assaulting five boys while working as a prison officer at the now-closed Medomsley Detention Centre, near Consett in the 1970's and 1980. Husband, denied the charges but was found guilty at Newcastle Crown Court and jailed for eight years. He later abandoned his appeal against conviction. He was due to stand trial at the same court yesterday accused of similar assaults on six other males at the centre after they came forward as a result of the first case. The trial was abandoned after he admitted sexually abusing four of the six all now in their 40s. Judge Esmond Faulks sentenced Husband to two years imprisonment to run consecutively to the eight he is already serving. Although the Judge gave Husband credit for his guilty pleas, which did save all victims the trauma of having to re-live their ordeal in the witness box, “we don’t believe that his pleading guilty was anything more than a time & cost cutting exercise.” But he told him: "In your care were boys often from broken homes, or with personality problems.” Instead of helping them overcome their problems, you took advantage of your position to sexually abuse a number of them with violence. It was a gross and wicked breach of trust which almost inevitably worsened whatever personality disorders they were suffering from in the first place. "It effectively amounts to a campaign of homosexual rape over many years involving nine boys at least. “He exploited his trust and power over them behind his badge of office." The court heard Husband used his position in charge of kitchens at the military-style detention centre near Consett to select victims, using fear and violence to ensure their silence. One of the latest four victims to come forward told how during one attack, Husband sexually assaulted him in a storeroom, holding a bread knife to his neck when he screamed. "Each of the victims has to a greater or lesser extent been left with deep and long lasting psychological scars. Many of his victims suffered countless assaults of the most dehumanising nature leaving them irreparably damaged; all are suffering with moderate to severe post traumatic disorder, persecution complexes, agoraphobia, and so many other psychological stressors it is hard to know where to begin. The British Home Office refuses to take any responsibilities for the actions of their servants for the torture of so many young men just starting out in their lives and yes it may well be said that we were bad lads when it would be more accurate to say ill educated, poverty stricken, emotionally lost and vulnerable. The case to date in just one instance has a bill of £81,000 while the legal aid board has just sent legal aid extension form out two weeks before the case comes to court in relation to the statues of limitations they have to decide whether to continue funding our cases. We are asking all of our friends out there in cyberspace to write a letter of support for us for when we go, letters of support to the judge, would help us we feel. We feel so low at the moment but we will keep fighting win at court or not, please send your letters of support to kevin@justice4survivors.org Where I can print them out to give to the judge. We would like to thank you for your ongoing support as well as for your letters to the judge, “I will make sure the judge reads them too.”